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Almond, Darren: All Things Pass

Almond, Darren: Terminus

Arnolds, Thomas

Brown, Glenn: Dessins

Brown, Glenn

Butzer, André

Dienst, Rolf-Gunter: Frühe Bilder und Gouachen

Ecker, Bogomir: You’re Never Alone

Förg, Günther

Galerie Max Hetzler: Remember Everything

Galerie Max Hetzler: 1994–2003

Hains, Raymond

Hatoum, Mona (Kunstmuseum
St. Gallen)

Eric Hattan Works. Werke Œuvres 1979–2015

Hattan, Eric: Niemand ist mehr da

Herrera, Arturo: Series

Herrera, Arturo: Boy and Dwarf

Hilliard, John: Accident and Design

Holyhead, Robert

Horn, Rebecca / Hayden Chisholm: Music for Rebecca Horn's installations

Kahrs, Johannes: Down ’n out

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Kowski, Uwe: Paintings and Watercolors

La mia ceramica

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Marepe

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Neto, Ernesto: From Sebastian to Olivia

Niemann, Christoph

Oehlen, Albert (Paintings 2014)

Oehlen, Albert: Interieurs

Oehlen, Albert: Mirror Paintings

Oehlen, Albert: Luckenwalde

Phillips, Richard: Early Works on Paper

Riley, Bridget: The Stripe Paintings 1961–2012

Riley, Bridget: Paintings and Related Works 1983–2010

Sammlung im Wandel: Die Sammlung Rudolf und Ute Scharpff

Smith, Josh: Abstraction

Tunga: Laminated Souls

de Waal, Edmund: Irrkunst

Warren, Rebecca

Wei, Zhang

Wool, Christopher: Road

Wool, Christopher: Westtexaspsychosculpture

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Collector's Editions

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Richard Phillips:
Early Works on Paper

With a text by Linda Yablonsky


English
Hardcover
22 x 27 cm
80 pages
33 color plates
978-3-935567-37-4
35.00 Euro

 

The years 1993 and 1994 were bum years for Richard Phillips. Creative years too, since that was when he made the thirty-odd drawings in this portfolio. With the air so cold and the heat not working and the rent going unpaid for eight months, Phillips, working in his kitchen, conjured one image after another: a homeless man is burned alive by a thug; a deranged blonde cuddles with a white rabbit, certain they must be sisters; a monumental god carved into a temple at Angkor Wat mirrors the face of Alice Cooper—two gods in one! Phillips’s sources were discarded newspapers, but if you look behind the mottled surfaces the pictures really derive from the conflicted state of his soul.


Each of these drawings is a complete work, none were intended only as studies. “They were meant to be entertaining,” Phillips tells author Linda Yablonsky, “but they also pushed me to go farther and farther.” Ultimately, these drawings gave Phillips the freedom to paint. What they give us is the power to see through the dark.

 

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In collaboration with Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin